Smorgasbord Short Stories – You are never too old to be loved by Sally Cronin

Delightful story with a twist

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Hopefully by the time that you read this we will be able to get out of our driveway!  However, we have also had intermittent power cuts for the last couple of days, so I am leaving you some short stories over the weekend, as well as the usual Open House Interview tomorrow.

This first story is not from one of my books but first appeared on Sue Vincent’s blog at Christmas. I hope you enjoy if reading for the first time…Photographs from our snow bound garden.

You are never too old to be loved by Sally Cronin

He was getting on a bit in years, his eyesight was very dodgy, and his hip was definitely causing him jip. His teeth were just about okay; he still enjoyed his meat slightly chewy, instead of that pap that they gave the real oldies in this residence. And if truth be told, despite…

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Smorgasbord Reblog – Memoir Bytes: – The 10 Red Flags I Didn’t Pay Attention To – Domestic Abuse by D.G. Kaye

Great memoirs by a talented writer.

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

D.G. Kaye writes memoirs, which in some cases, takes nerves of steel. It is very hard to live through an abusive relationship and even harder when you relive it by sharing. But by sharing others who feel helpless can become empowered and that in itself is worth the pain of writing the story. Debby shares a story from her life today that resonates with many of us and I do hope that you will head over and read.

Vision perception - Memoirs

Oh c’mon Deb, you never give a guy a chance,” my bestie Bri lectured on. “You have too many stipulations about dating before you let anyone into your life.”

I was managing an office for a PR firm when I met ‘him’. He’d drop by once a week to pick up work as a freelance editor, After five or six visits and a couple of flirty chats with ‘him’ he’d…

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Meet Maretha Botha — RRBC Spotlight Author

Enjoy your tour. Your books are adorable. I am tying to decide which one I want first. A belated thanks for your review of my book, And the Whippoorwill Sang. I have been in the hospital and still refined to home. Loved the review–definitely one of my favorites

Marcha's Two-Cents Worth

MarethaBothaPic1

Maretha Botha is an Italian National, born in South Africa in a small Western Province town called Montague and grew up in nearby Worcester – a town reminiscent of living in Switzerland among the snow-capped mountains in winter. Worcester had a small library. At the time, the librarian limited young Maretha’s visits to three times a week, because “You spend too much time with your nose in a book and neglect your school work.”

Maretha Botha has remained a confirmed bookworm and constantly strives to raise more bookworms who will enjoy reading, not just as a pleasant past-time, but as an excellent tool to be used when grown-up. The area around her birthplace and hometown is often a source of inspiration. She had this landscape in mind when describing the Molodi valley “as an out-of-the-way place, somewhere in the grasslands of Southern Africa.”

flameandhopecvrExcerpt from “Flame and Hope: An African…

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9 Things an Empath Will Hide From You

The Sisters of the Fey

Are you an empath? Do you know which attributes tell you you’re an empath?

This article is quite informative and accurate with the 9 signs listed below that help you identify with being an empath. I was born an empath so I can relate to all these signs. Can you relate to any of them?

Some people misconstrue the definitions of empathy and sympathy. Below are the definitions of these two words explained from Meriam Webster’s Dictionary.com

empathy

[em-puh-thee] 
Spell Syllables
noun

1.

the psychological identification with or vicarious experiencing
 of the feelings, thoughts,
or attitudes of one another.

2.

the imaginative ascribing to an object, as natural object or work
 of art, 

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Let’s Play Follow The Leader – @rijanjks #RRBC #RWISA

Great new re-release off Flowers and Stone, by Jan Sikes.

Watch Nonnie Write!

Thank you all for dropping by today.  I hope it was the title of this post that enticed you to do so.

Many of you may be aware that early last year I took my debut novel, “DAYDREAM’S DAUGHTER, NIGHTMARE’S FRIEND” down from Amazon.  (I’ve recently discovered that in my haste to do so, I only removed the e-book format and it is still there in paperback format, but hopefully, no one’s buying it).  I did this, because although it received many positive reviews, I just happened to open a paperback copy one day to find some very glaring “hiccups.”  I was so blown away (that they were glaring…at least to me) that I rushed to Amazon and yanked it down with such force, I think I hurt my arm. (I’m sorry, poor arm).

Anyway, with running the hugely busy and successful communities known as RRBC & RWISA, I…

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VALENTINE’S DAY: THEN AND NOW

February 14th sometimes signifies the first day of Lent, depending upon the date of Easter, and is also Admission Day in Arizona. Most people however, celebrate the day by sending comic or heartfelt Valentines to family, friends and lovers. People seem to delight in St. Valentine’s Day, as florists, candy stores, boutiques and card shops do a rallying business providing heart-shaped novelties of all variety. Chocolate, long known for having properties that produce a euphoric feeling similar to the bittersweet emotion of love, seems an appropriate gift for St. Valentine’s Day.

The origin of the holiday is uncertain, but St. Valentine actually honors two Saints of the same name. One was a Roman priest martyred during the reign of the Emperor Claudius, the other, a martyred Bishop of Interramna. They were both buried in the Flaminian Way, which was later named the Gate of St. Valentine. Today the gate is known as Porta Del Popolo — the Gate of the People. The accounts of these men’s lives are legendary, based on sparse historical fact. It is possible, researchers agree, that the legends denote different versions of the martyrdom of only one person. St. Valentine’s Day, as it is known today, is a lovers Festival, bearing no relation to these legends.
One theory as to how the name Valentine came to be applied to the day is founded on the belief in England that birds begin dating on February 14. Chaucer, in his “Parliament of Foules,” says it like this: “for this was Seynt Valentine’s day. When every foul cometh to choose his mate.” Those disagreeing with this claimed that the connection between lovers and St. Valentine stems from a similarity between the Norman word “galantin,” meaning a lover of woman, and the name of the saint. St. Still another theory contends that the lover’s custom dates back to the pagan Roman feast of Lupercalia occurring in mid-February young Roman men and women placed their names in a love urn from which their names were drawn at random. During the upcoming year, the young man would be the escorts of the women whose names were matched to their own.

The Christian clergy objected to this pagan custom and substituted the names of saints. Each person, the clergy hoped, which strive to emulate the saint drawn for them. The drawings were held on February 14, the feast of St. Valentine. Yet the drawing of names by young people on St. Valentine’s Day continued long after the Christianization of pagan rites had been abandoned. The boy and girl paired by the drawing adopted the practice of giving presents to each other. Later the boy only gave to the girl; so started the custom of sending Valentines to loved ones.

St. Valentine’s Day was widely celebrated in William Shakespeare’s time, as this quote from Hamlet illustrates:
“Good morrow, ‘tis St. Valentine’s Day,
All in the morning betime,
And I am made at your window,
To be your Valentine.”

Paper Valentines with inscribed sentiments date from the 16th century. The first printed Valentine, issued in 1669, was probably inspired by “A Valentine Writer”, a book of verses offering help to those not articulate enough to pen their own rhymes. In England, the introduction of Penny postage and envelopes in 1840 popularized the exchange of Valentines and ornamental lace paper Valentines were in great demand. In the U. S., crude woodcut Valentines were fashioned by Robert H. Elton and Thomas W. Strong of New York, but most people preferred the lace paper cards imported from England.
With the establishment of the Post Office, the mail became swamped with Valentines each February. Comic Valentines, as well as coarse vulgar ones, cost only one cent. In the early 1900s, the Chicago post office rejected 25,000 cards on the grounds that they were improper for mail delivery. By the 1930s Valentine cards were primarily an activity for small children, who were taught to make the cards and decorations in kindergarten.

On one particularly gruesome Valentine’s Day, the streets ran red with blood and the message given was not one of love. This notorious incident was “The St. Valentines Massacre,” in Chicago on February 14, 1929. Al Capone’s gang, disguised as policemen, forced seven members of the rival “Bugs Moran” gang to stand against the garage wall with their arms raised. Capone’s mobsters methodically gunned the rival gang down.

recent years, St. Valentine’s Day continues to gain popularity, as lovers and children eagerly await its arrival; perhaps because it breaks the monotony of the long winter. However, not all people recognize the holiday. One husband whose name I will not mention, chooses to totally ignore St. Valentine’s Day, even when it falls three days after his wedding anniversary — but that’s another story.

A LIFETIME OF LOVE & MORE TO COME

Hi Everybody!! February 11,1959, two teenagers thought it might be a good idea to elope to Maryland and and get married in a double wedding ceremony with Micki’s recently divorced mother. Hmmm …. what do you guys think?

You can find out a lot more in . . . And the Whippoorwill Sang
Meanwhile, HAPPY ANNIVERSARY TO THE MAN I LOVE!
AND ‘NO’ TO ANY OF MY 10 GRANDKIDS WHO MIGHT BE THINKING OF TRYING IT!!
https://www.amazon.com/Micki-Pe…/e/B002BLZ7JK/ref=sr_tc_2_0…