DISCOVERING ENGLISH LITERATURE IN BITS & BYTES: AN INTERNET APPROACH

Adiditional Online Data for book series: Discovering English Literature in Bits and Bytes: An Internet Approach, to British and American Literature, including Activities As A GuideTo Critical Thinking

SERIES ONE: BRITISH LITERATURE, VOLUME ONE: BRITISH LITERATURE – BEGINNINGS, SECTION ONE: ANGLO-SAXON LITERATURE, CHAPTER FOUR: A LETTER ON THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING or PROSE PREFACE TO POPEGREGORY’S PASTORAL CARE (894); and Other Works in Old English such as TALKING POETRY; KING ALFRED’S POEMS: FIRST TURNED INTO ENGLISH METRES; PREFACE TO ST. AUGUSTINE’S SOLILOQUIES; and EXCERPTS FROM ALFRED’S WORKS THAT EXPRESS KING ALFRED’S EPITAPH

ADDITIONAL WEB SITES (SOME CITED IN CHAPTER 4) WITH MORE INFORMATION

Transcription of Alfred’s Old EnglishProse Preface to Gregory’s PASTORAL CAREhttp://www.departments.bucknell.edu/english/courses/engl440/pastoral.shtml (click links)                                                                                                                    …

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THE WHISPER by Pamela Zagarenski

The Reader and the Book

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This is a book about the joy and delight in reading and imagining.  It is a book about creativity and having fun.  It is a beautiful book in color, in creation, and in childhood (no matter what age one is!).  As I looked upon each double-page I felt a delight in the visual as well as where my mind began to take me.

“There once was a little girl who loved stories.  She loved how the words and pictures took her to new and secret places that existed in a world all her own….” 

The little girl’s teacher loans her a book.  It is a special book to this teacher because her grandmother gave it to her as a gift.

As the little girl heads home, the book is under her arm and is slightly open.  The words are escaping from the pages and into the air.  We, then, see…

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SPOTLIGHT AUTHOR FOR 7/10-7/16

Our “SPOTLIGHT” this week is on MICKI PELUSO, author of “…AND THE WHIPPOORWILL SANG” which you can snag a copy of at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007OWPBGK.

To find out even more about MICKI, the amazing support-filled package she’s receiving this week, and to support her on her 7-day blog tour, please visit the “SPOTLIGHT” Author’s page on this site.

Don’t forget to join MICKI as she takes her chances up “ON THE SHELF” with Nonnie Jules on Thursday, 7/14/16 as well as sitting down for a LIVE interview on the RAVE WAVES show, “BRING ON THE SPOTLIGHT.”

So much fun for MICKI as she sits under “the” most fabulous “SPOTLIGHT” ever!

Let’s show @MickiPeluso grand support while she sits in this fabulous “hot” seat here at RAVE REVIEWS BOOK CLUB, so that when you’re sitting here, the same will be done for you!!!

https://ravereviewsbynonniejules.wordpress.com/weekly-club-updates-week-709-71616/

Monster-Spotting in Medieval Maps, Part II

This is an amazing piece of information

Nicholas C. Rossis

The Psalter Map | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books The Psalter World Map, c. 1260 Photo: Atlas Obscura / Public Domain/Wikipedia Commons)

East is placed at the top. The sun and moon hold lush forests. Jerusalem is the center of the world. And dragons hold the globe up at the bottom. But there is one aspect of the Psalter World Map, created in the 1260s, that is even stranger: a line-up of grotesque men located near Africa, two of whom have faces in their chests.

Blemmyae

These monsters, called blemmyae, were actually based on the writings of Classical authors such as Pliny the Elder. In The Natural History, penned in 77 AD, Pliny wrote of the members of a North African tribe who were “said to have no heads, their mouths and eyes being seated in their breasts.”

Over 1500 years later, authors were still talking about these chest-faced men. In Othello, none other than Shakespeare wrote…

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ASK AND YOU SHALL RECEIVE #RRBC #RWISA

Watch Nonnie Write!

People wonder why I sometimes refer to myself as “Careful Chooser of Words.”  If I’ve had a recent visit to see the doctor, I get phone calls from family and friends, asking: “Well, what did he say?  What’s wrong?”  Most often, they all get the same response of, “Nothing’s wrong with me and I refuse to claim that, which is not mine, therefore, I will not speak on it.”  When they hear those words, they instantly know to move on to another topic.  {“So, how many people did you terrify in Walmart today?”}

Shocked looking dog

I share openly that I’m not a really religious person, but I am a spiritual person.  I have a strong belief that what you speak into the Universe, the Universe will return to you.  Because of this belief, I am careful what I put out, as I know that I will get…

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Validation – peer reviews are the best!

This is an awesome post, don’t miss reading it all.

Siân Glírdan

I’m still walking on air, despite discovering Amazon UK’s pitiful inability to support editorial reviews for indie author-publishers. Yesterday I received a splendid review from one of A Freebooter’s Fantasy Almanac beta-readers, Ronald E. Yates. I say yesterday, but in fact this came to me last Friday and promptly fell into the swirling vortex that was my email inbox, thanks to the dizzy success of the blog tour that had me zipping all over cyberspace the whole week.

Ron’s review lay there until yesterday morning, when I finally came up for air and recalled seeing his mail and attachment ‘over the weekend’, and then promptly forgot all about opening it – because I hadn’t… *blushes deeply*.
Enough wittering for now – here’s what Ron had to say about our bouncing babe.

Writing, as any author will tell you, is an intensely personal endeavor. We scribblers pour heart and soul into the…

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Molly Greene’s Advice on Going Permafree on Amazon

Good thing to know for Indie writers

Nicholas C. Rossis

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books From timashton.org.uk

A short while back, my friend Charles E. Yallowitz decided to make the first book of his fantasy Legends of Windemere series permafree. This is something I’ve been considering myself, but I’ve always wondered just how to go around achieving it.

Amazon doesn’t make goinf free easy, and the advice I’ve been reading was all about going permafree on one of the other outlets (Barnes & Nobles, Google Play, iBooks etc) and getting a few friends of yours to notify Amazon that they’ve found your book cheaper there. Amazon should then match the price – ie make your title free. John Chapman has a step-by-step post on how to do this.

However, I’ve also been reading about cases where Amazon just doesn’t seem to care. Apparently, some people have been waiting for months for that to work. So, when I came across a post by celebrated author 

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Month-Long Smashwords Sale Including The Bow of Destiny

Great book–get your copy now!!!

Archer's Aim

bow of destinySmashwords is hosting a site-wide sale for ebooks throughout the month of July. The Bow of Destiny is a participating title with a steep 50% off of the current price of $2.99. Never used Smashwords before? Well, you are in luck since all major ebook formats are available including .mobi (Kindle Fire) & .epub (Nook & others). This is a great time to try out Smashwords and get The Bow of Destiny at nice price. Have friends or family who like fantasy? Make sure to tell them about The Bow of Destiny too.

However, if you prefer purchasing from Amazon, I’ll have The Bow of Destiny on sale their throughout the rest of the month at the same price ($1.49). With either vendor you can get the deal! Want to sample my writing otherwise? No problem. Just see the links for Trading Knives and What Is Needed at the end of the…

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The Anatomy of a SHORT Synopsis – Pt 1

Good info to have when writing a synopsis!!

Intense Life Coaching

After playing around on the interwebz this week I discovered a theme emerge among my writerly buds…lots of angst over the dreaded synopsis. Now, I’m not saying writing a synopsis is a piece of cake – far from it. But, there is a way to do it that s a little less painful.

The editors, agents and published authors I’ve spoken with have all said that shorter is better when it comes to the synopsis.

WHAT? SHORTER…It’s hard enough cramming the storyline of a 70 – 80K novel into a few pages single spaced. Now I need to cram it into 500 words or so. CRAZY!

True…but totally doable too.

That is, once you really KNOW the arc of your story.

That’s right, a synopsis can be an easy endeavor, relatively speaking, if you have taken the time to plot out your story arc.

For me, the easy way to…

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